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MySQL News

10/25/2005
MySQL 5.0 first Production Release is out.

A new version of the popular Open Source Database Management System has been released. The Community Edition is now available in source and binary form for a number of platforms from our download pages at http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/ and mirror sites.

Note that not all mirror sites may be up to date at this point in time - if you can't find this version on some mirror, please try again later or choose another download site.

This is the first production release of the 5.0 release family, which offers substantial new features. For further information, please see the web page with the major new features.

Please pay special attention to the manual, section 2.10.2, "Upgrading from Version 4.1 to 5.0.", and to the additional notes at the end of this announcement.

MySQL has worked very hard to ensure a high level of quality, but as it is starting a new release family, we recommend that you protect your data by making a backup before migrating to it.

Please refer to the bug database at http://bugs.mysql.com/ for more details about the individual open and resolved bugs in this version.

Changes in release 5.0.15:

  • Warning: Incompatible change. The CHAR() function now returns a binary string rather than a string in the connection character set. An optional USING charset clause may be used to produce a result in a specific character set instead. Also, arguments larger than 256 produce multiple characters. They are no longer interpreted modulo 256 to produce a single character each. These changes may cause some incompatibilities, as noted in Section 2.10.2, "Upgrading from Version 4.1 to 5.0."
  • When executing single-table UPDATE or DELETE queries containing an ORDER BY ... LIMIT N clause, but not having any WHERE clause, MySQL can now take advantage of an index to read the first N rows in the ordering specified in the query. If an index is used, only the first N records will be read, as opposed to scanning the entire table.
  • The following statements now cause an implicit COMMIT: CREATE VIEW, ALTER VIEW, DROP VIEW, CREATE TRIGGER, DROP TRIGGER, CREATE USER, RENAME USER, DROP USER
  • Character set conversion was not being done for FIND_IN_SET()
  • Queries of the form (SELECT ...) ORDER BY ... were being treated as a UNION. This improperly resulted in only distinct values being returned (because  UNION  by  default  eliminates duplicate results). Also, references to column aliases in ORDER BY clauses following parenthesized SELECT statements were not resolved properly.
  • If special characters such as '_' , '%', or the escape character were included within the prefix of a column index, LIKE pattern matching on the indexed column did not return the correct result.

And many more...

Source: dev.mysql.com

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